Nirvana sucks according to this ridiculously rare Kurt Cobain guitar case.

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*Note the deep indentations inside the case from clearly a left handed guitar in a right handed case. Very Kurt. 

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img_5554-1This incredibly unique, highly decorated case originally housed Kurt’s Washburn Force 2 guitar.

This guitar was used for a very brief period of time in the late 1989. It was built in Japan and featured black finish with a matching headstock color, rosewood fretboard, and a humbucker in the bridge position.

Kurt smashed it on December 3rd, 1989 at Astoria Theatre.

This case can be ALSO be seen in a 1991 Charles Peterson photograph sitting on the side of the stage at their March 8, 1991 Commodore Ballroom Vancouver performance and on the cover of the “With the Lights Out” box set.

Written boldly on the case is “Melvins Say Nirvana Sucks.” It was thought to have been written by Buzz of the Melvins, but he didn’t remember doing it.

Looks like it could be Kurt’s handwriting and holds some strong similarities in writing style and letter forms.

See the example shown here.

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If you check out the Kurt Cobain documentary “Montage of Heck” you can see a clip of him walking with this case!

This case also held another guitar or maybe even guitars. The guitar Kurt is playing in the photos shown below, the Fender Strat MIJ #2, this case likely held as well. This guitar alone has a very storied history.

This case is insanely rare piece of Nirvana memorabilia, not only because it was Kurt’s case, but also because of the guitars it held.

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Kurt’s Gear.

As far as the Kurt’s gear goes, he had a pretty high tolerance level towards what kind of a guitar he happened to be playing. It needed to have proper tuners and a humbucker in the bridge, preferably a Seymour Duncan JB, and it needed to be cheap and inefficient. A couple of guitars do stick out from the bunch though – like his 1965 Fender Jaguar which was used extensively in the Nevermind era, and his sonic-blue Mustang which became main instrument on the album In Utero.

Information above provided by groundguitar.com. http://www.groundguitar.com/kurt-cobain-gear/

In March 1991 Kurt started playing a black left-handed Japanese made Stratocaster with white pickguard and a full-sized humbucker in the bridge position. (pictured above.)

Kurt still had this guitar when the band entered the studio for the second time in May 1991, during which they recorded most of the songs that ended up on the final release of Nevermind (Polly was recorded year earlier). Kurt did use this guitar during the sessions, but he had problems with it and ended up smashing it during the recording of “Endless, Nameless.” It was by no means the only guitar he had used on Nevermind – he also had his Jaguar, blue Mustang, and his Mosrite Gospel at the time.

The guitar was repaired and appeared once again in June, but with humbucker no longer being angled and a Tune-O-Matic bridge installed instead of the stock Fender tremolo. Kurt kept using it occasionally up until October 1991, when it was finally destroyed at the end of the set at Cabaret Metro in Chicago. The band played “Endless, Nameless” for their closing song, during which Kurt took Dave’s place behind the drums. After the show ended they completely demolished Dave’s drum set, reportedly using this guitar as their main tool of destruction.

eiikbdpYears later a black Stratocaster body split in two was displayed at the EMP Museum in Seattle. According to them, that was the body of the guitar that Kurt smashed during recording of Nevermind.

emp-museum-seattle-nirvana-exhibition-cobain-guitar-02screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-11-43-11-amAs you can see this is a significant item in Nirvana’s and Kurt Cobain’s history. See many more rare Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Motely Crue and Doors items on https://www.collectionzz.com/

https://www.collectionzz.com/TheVision/theexperience2010

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